Stranded in the Pacific Ocean. The REALLY slow boat to Nuqui

“Yoni Yoni Yoni , yo copio”

“Yoni Yoni Yoni , yo copio”

It was at this moment I knew we were in trouble. Positioned somewhere 50 miles off the pacific coast, aimlessly floating, our stress call was made. 11:30 on a Friday afternoon the conditions couldn’t have been better but the situation couldn’t had been worse. After drifting for an hour or so and a nonstop barrage of Colombian explicits from the bottom deck, our situation was looking worse than a pimple on photo day.

Then ……..

The Colombian armada arrived. Armed with iPhones recording our inconvenience like a group of Chinese tourists at the Golden Gate Bridge, these guys obviously hadn’t had much activity in their territory lately. Joke after joke they couldn’t have been more ready to save us from our misery and add some light to their day.

One after one we evacuated onto their ship with all of our belongings. We were then quickly escorted to the nearest Puebla close to 45 minutes away. The problem was we were still 4 hours away from our end destination, Nuqui.

Upon arrival we were greeted by the rest of the armada & documented for our safety & forward travel. This documentation also consisted of countless photos with the armada that probably will end up as their new myspace profile picture.

After a 15 minute walk through the ghost like streets we took respite in a strangers front porch that someone somehow knew. (Colombians seem to always know someone, somewhere) Our group of 12 had scattered but one after one made their way to the house as if some magnets were pulling them in.

Where is everyone going to stay was my first thought while we sat in this area awaiting news of possible evening departures but hate to spoil it for you; that never came. A few hours passed, nothing. Finally around 6 we got positive news,

“Ok! Entonces. Mañana a las 6:30”

Confirmation for our next boat to Nuqui was made loud and clear by our self acclaimed group leader. This was a relief and blessing knowing we could venture the city to become the main attraction of the night.

Yes the main attraction.

Luis, a 12 year old Colombian approached Mario & I armed with questions about our presence:

  • Why are you here ?
  • Where are you from?
  • How long will you be here?
  • Wait why are you here?

Minutes later we were quickly swarmed by 50 + young Colombians with a keen interest to hear our English accents and favorite futbol teams. This conversation lasted for about 20 minutes until the Puebla experienced a blackout sending us home to pack for our 6 am wake up.

The morning was early for Mario & I but for the Colombians, no. All of them were full of energy. After about an hour our boat was finally ready & we were off to wade through the water to continue on with the journey.

3 hours later & a morning of 6 whales, 10 dolphins & cloud reflected glassy water, we had finally arrived to Nuqui.

..Finally

This initial slow boat was intended to take 24 hours from Buenaventura to Nuqui direct. However, the minor inconvenience really made the destination more memorable. Throughout the moments of doing nothing, language breakdowns, anger & hopelessness, I would recommend this boat trip to someone with some flex on time.

Have you ever been on this boat journey?

Have you ever been to the Choco región?

Comment & let me know If you’ve had a similar or completely different experience. Also drop a line if you need an updated look at boats to and from Nuqui as information is few and far between.

Headed back to Medellin and don’t know what tours you should do? Check my must do tours list while you’re in the city of Eternal spring.

https://ezmoments.com/2018/09/08/5-medellin-tours-every-backpacker-should-add-to-their-list/

3 thoughts on “Stranded in the Pacific Ocean. The REALLY slow boat to Nuqui

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